Friday, January 13, 2012

How to Make a Ghost Detector Circuit

Do you believe in the existence of ghosts? Well some of you may answer positively while some may just nod their heads showing sheer skepticism regarding the issue. Whatever may be the reactions; nobody just can’t deny or ignore the responses delivered from the circuit explained in this article.

 Here we are discussing a super simple yet super sensitive paranormal activity sniffer circuit, which can be effectively and possibly used for detecting ghosts or similar supernatural existence within a range of 10 meters. Many of these circuits may be built and posted at definite intervals for securing a certain premise having a large area. The circuit incorporates an alarm at the output which sounds immediately on detecting a paranormal intrusion. The circuit is ideally suited for areas that are prone to ghosts or likely of getting infested with similar para-natural sneakers.


WARNING 1 – THE DEVICE HAS BEEN TESTED WITH POSITIVE RESULTS AND IS PROVED TO BE EXTREMELY ACCURATE WITH THE DISCUSSED DETECTIONS. FOLKS WITH WEAK HEARTS OR TENDER PERSONALITY ARE ADVISED NOT TO GO ABOUT WITH THIS DEVICE, BECAUSE THE DEVICE NOT ONLY DETECTS BUT ALSO COINCIDENTALLY HAS THE ABILITY OF ATTRACTING THE PARABEINGS.

WARNING 2 – THE DEVICE CAN BE TESTED IN MORGUES, GRAVEYARDS, cemeteries etc. ZOMBIES ARE THE ONES WHICH ARE INSTANTLY DETECTED BY THIS DEVICE EVEN FROM DISTANCES MORE THAN 50 METERS. NO DOUBT CREATURE LIKE ZOMBIES WILL HATE THIS DEVICE….BEWARE.

Concept

It has been found through experiments by many researchers that paranormal occupancy is strongly accompanied by RF disturbances ranging from a few Hertz to many Kilohertz.

These signals may be directly proportional to the hostile nature of the ghost. Zombies are found to be emitting the strongest signals and are therefore considered the most horrible among the lot.


The circuit of a ghost detector discussed here is typically configured for capturing the above RF emissions from these creatures and transforming them into more human understandable electronic indications.

Circuit Description

A single versatile IC 324 is involved in the whole operation.

The IC is a quad opamp IC, meaning four opamps in one package.



Referring to the figure, the opamps can be seen configured as hi gain non inverting amplifiers.

All the opamps are configured as high gain signal amplifiers.

Tiny electromagnetic or RF disturbances which are typically found being generated during the presence of ghosts or paranormal activities are instantly picked up by the antenna of the circuit and are fed to the input of the first opamp stage at pin #9.

The signals get instantly amplified and are transferred to the subsequent stages for further amplification and enhancement.

The output of the last opamp is connected to an opto-coupler.

The optocoupler is a homemade type, incorporating an LED and an LDR fixed such that their emitting and detecting surfaces are placed face to face inside a light proof enclosure.

Here, the optocoupler is used for sensing the LED illumination that may occur when a certain paranormal activity is sensed.

The illumination produced over the LED is tracked by the LDR whose resistance falls with the LED light. 
The fall in the resistance of the LDR activates the connected transistor at the output, which in turn actuates a buzzer or a horn indicating a possible ghost intrusion.

The whole circuit may be built over a small piece of vero-board and should be strictly operated with a 9 volt battery.

The whole system may be enclosed inside a plastic box with the antenna kept protruding out of the box.

Parts List

R1 = 100K,
R2 = 2M2,
R3, R4 = 1K,
C1 = 0.01uF ceramic
OP1 = LED/LDR assembly inside a light proof enclosure,
T1 = BC557,
B1 = Piezo Electric Buzzer

READERS ARE REQUESTED TO SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCES WITH THIS DEVICE. A PHOTO OR A VIDEO PROOF WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED....

20 comments:

  1. Thank you for the circuit. Your parts list is missing the value for the C1 capacitor, and I also believe that your statement:

    "...are instantly picked up by the antenna of the circuit and are fed to the input of the opamp at pin #2"

    ...that you mean pin #9 and not pin #2, no?

    Again, thank you!!

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  2. Hello, I have built several of these but am having similar problems in all. My latest is on a breadboard and all connections are correct and securely seated. The circuit is INDEED sensitive because the LED flickers from the piezo click on a cheap lighter from 4 inches away from the antenna. The problem is that once the LED is triggered, it stays illuminated until I touch the ground with my finger. If I keep my finger on the ground, the circuit works perfectly! I am using 6 AA cells in a battery holder to supply the 9V. This is not a breadboard problem as the exact circuit that I soldered onto a peice of PCB exhibits the exact same symptom. I have set the circuit down on many different surfaces and am having the same problem no matter if it is on a wooden table, floor, or leather couch. Do you have any ideas for me?

    THANK YOU for the circuit!

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    Replies
    1. You can try two options, either you eliminate two of the stages or reduce the value of R2 for all the opamps to probably 1M or even lower, this will reduce the sensitivity of the circuit and keep the LED shut off in the absence of any RF signal.

      Regards.

      Delete
    2. Thank you! For a 1st test I have lowered all R2's to 1M and that has greatly improved the LED staying on situation.

      The unit behaves differently if it is sitting by itself vs. if I am holding it in my hand. When holding it in a plastic enclosure with the antenna wire protruding out the opposite side so that it is as far away from my skin as possible, the unit will still tend to keep the LED on once triggered. It does not do this if I am NOT holding it. If my body is acting as an antenna, it would make sense that the unit is more responsive, but I don't think that is what I am seeing. I have rigged a fluorescent light that I can turn on and off with my foot. If I am holding the unit (even at arms length), once the LED is triggered, it tends to stay lit. If I set it down so that my hand is not touching the plastic enclosure but my body is in a similar proximity to the unit, then the LED triggers perfectly to the fluorescent going on and off. As soon as my hand is simply touching the plastic enclosure though, the behavior changes a bit where once the LED is triggered, it will stay lit.

      When I am holding the enclosure, is the proximity of my hand somehow changing the ground bias or acting as an antenna (or influencing the overall capacitance of the circuit) that might make the LED stay lit after it is triggered?

      Thanks again for the circuit and for your knowledge and help!

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    3. Thanks for the valuable data.
      Yes the circuit is too sensitive and if not controlled can behave a bit erratically.
      Your body is acting like a radar and helping the circuit's antenna to pick up all the accumulated signals from your body, even if it's not directly attached to the circuit.
      You can try connecting the LED/resistor at pin 14 of the IC, you may disconnect the relevant C1 from pin6 of the next stage.
      This position will hopefully keep the LED calm.
      Regards

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    4. Certainly the circuit's sensitivity can be changed by raising or lowering the value of R2, as well as trying different lengths of wire for the antenna, but if the circuit WAS made TOO sensitive by varying these aspects, then I believe the behavior would be "a mostly always-on LED". I believe what is happening in my testing is bigger than just "accumulated signals from my body".

      Isn't it possible that the power supply and IC might need a few stages of de-coupling to reduce induced noise in the circuit?

      By my testing (albeit with a "too sensitive" setup), is it possible that there could be an induced noise buildup in the circuit? I ask this because it seems that once a certain amount of detected RF is fed through the circuit to "really light it up", the operation of the circuit then fails to detect RF and instead feeds off itself by the noise induced during its operation.

      Please know that I am a complete noob and have just done alot of reading. My test circuit really seems to have a "threshold" at which the LED just goes completely bright...and stays that way even if I walk away from the source that triggered the LED in the first place. Its like once the "threshold" is crossed, the circuit self-feeds itseld with internal noise and thus "detects" the highest possible RF that is not really coming from the antenna wire, but rather coming from the wires, traces, components, and the IC itself....it seems to cascade into a self-detecting endless noise loop that lights the LED to its brightest....I think physically touching the ground helps bleed off that self-sustaining cascade of circuit noise so that the circuit behaves as intended again until the threshold is again reached.

      In reading about opamps and circuits, it seems to this beginner that a fairly heavy does of de-coupling needs to be incorporated into the circuit.

      As I know literally NOTHING about electronics, my observations and reading lead me to believe that some decoupling of the power supply and the IC at each of the 4 stages (or maybe just the whole of the LM324) would allow for this circuit to become SUPER sensitive without reaching a point where internal induced circuit noise renders it inoperative as for its intended purpose.

      I write this long note to you with the UTMOST of respect Swagatam!!

      Am I way off base on my theory of what can happen to this circuit regarding internal induced circuit noise?

      PS. reducing R2 and/or shortening the antenna, and/or using 2 stages instead of 4 certainly DOES reduce the sensitivity of the circuit, but that seems to be a bandaid way of just not letting the circuit get to the threshold "breaking" point where it starts to self-feed itself with induced noise. De-coupling could solve this and allow your great design to be super SUPER sensitive without falling into the cascading effect of ever increasing self-feeding circuit noise.....no?

      Again, THANK YOU for the circuit and THANK YOU for reading this noobies theory :)

      I wish I could have more confidence (and knowledge) as to what caps to use and where to use them in order to give the circuit a healthy does of de-coupling :)

      Thoughs? ....and if your thoughts are something like "WOW, this guy has no idea what he is talking about and is way out in left field".....then that would certainly be fair if that was your assessment of my long-winded writing :)

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    5. I really appreciate you for the in-depth analysis that you have done on the behavior of this circuit. Actually I had gone through similar problems when I was working with it.
      However my views are little different. You are right, the circuit can undergo a loop effect, but it won't, if it's powered from a DC source, that is, a battery.
      That's why I have strictly recommended the use of a battery for powering the circuit.
      Yet still if you are not satisfied and support the inclusion of a decoupling stage, then I would like it to be introduced at the beginning of the circuit.
      The idea may look foolish but short circuiting the antenna with ground, probably via a few turns of copper wire does the trick.

      If a noob is able to go about with such intensity I would rather prefer to become a noob:-) your knowledge in the subject looks better than me and I would request you to do the possible modifications, if any, and kindly make it available here so that all of us here are able to witness your commendable efforts in the field and appreciate your abilities.

      Thanks a lot.

      Delete
  3. Hi,

    Thanks for pointing out the mistakes!

    I have corrected the errors, please check them out.

    Regards.

    ReplyDelete
  4. do you have a update with the mods above worked out?

    ReplyDelete
  5. thanks for this circuit i am so much impressed i'll do this ckt ,, thanks swagatam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you are welcome.........and good luck to you!

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  6. This Android Application also similar but using magnet sensor.
    Can someone test it?

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.soulgrave.ghostivity&feature=search_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDEsImNvbS5zb3VsZ3JhdmUuZ2hvc3Rpdml0eSJd

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you too tight to spend £1.30? LOL

      Delete
  7. How can this circuit be improvised so that it detects the RF in the range 2.4-2.5GHz?

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    Replies
    1. the above circuit will not detect any signal as long as it's not strong enough....cell phone signals in air are not strong and needs to be amplified..... therefore the above circuit cannot be used for detecting 2GHz cell phone signals from the local netwrks

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  8. where is to connect negative terminal of battery..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. the line which carries the "earthing" symbol

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  9. Can you convert it to visual warning (like led), instead of audio warning (like buzzer). If yes, what components should I add/remove. thanks...

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    Replies
    1. Remove the entire buzzer section along with the opto and simply connect an LED in series with R3....

      Delete

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Readers are advised to proceed with the construction of the presented circuits only after understanding the concepts from the core. Not adhering to this can lead to failures and frustrations.